Rainbow Six Siege Recap and Review






A new Rainbow is here. After a long wait, Ubisoft launches its highly expected ‘Rainbow Six Siege’, a new installment of the popular series from Tom Clancy that has come up with new turns. After the demise of ‘Rainbow Six Patriots’, the French company decided to give gamers a twist from the classic franchise concepts and adapting to the new generation of consoles. Now ‘Rainbow Six’ has multiplayer, with a strong cooperative component but the end result is some what mixed. But rest assure this is one of the most addictive games of the 2015.

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Team cooperation is key

The release of ‘Rainbow Six Siege’ aroused the interest of the most competitive players. With a trailer showing the gameplay possibilities, Ubisoft excited with his new challenge in the genre of first-person action with online content. Initial reactions materialized with high expectations. We anticipate that, ultimately, ‘Rainbow Six Siege’ is pretty close to what we where promised. The game mechanics work. Divided into a number of levels and challenges, multiplayer mode is easy to master with a clear objective: to overcome your opponent. We will, therefore, to cooperate with other team members-other players- to rescue the hostage turn off one of the two bombs planted by terrorists or maintain positions for a certain time. The title divides players into groups of five, to give more variety, more than 20 operators are divided into attackers and defenders. These operators will grow in number as well as by stage, via free downloadable content, but for the moment, the game requires no more to run. Thus, on the side of attackers we have several characters that can burst through walls, or by deploying drones, launching cluster bombs, and so on. On the other side we find fortifications, shields and devices to locate enemies, among other parts of the map. Thus, Ubisoft has managed to strike a balance between teams, making each game different from the previous one in terms of characters and support with the other team members. In the first game we can be attackers, while the next will be on defense. But always the winner is decided from the best of five.

Training mode is hard

The producers of the game have introduced a series of training missions that give experience points and player recognition, essential to unlock new operators as well as let you know how the game mechanics work. At this point, we are able to play in solo mode to strengthen our methodology, and here comes one of the weaknesses of Rainbow Six Siege: the rate of frames per second. Unlike the multiplayer mode, where the title runs at 60 frames per second without problems, others operate at 30 frames, which is a problem during training. While it is true training serves precisely to take our first steps, the feeling of moving through these training missions is rather void. A third game mode, called the terrorist hunt, where with a group of five we have to deal with terrorists controlled by the artificial intelligence of the game in an environment of medium size. Again, cooperation is key to avoiding surprises and premature deaths. However, unlike other proposals, dying in ‘Rainbow Six Siege’ it is permanent and will last until the end of the round. Best of all is that, once fallen, we can help our partners by viewing the different security cameras and drones to give clues to our still alive allies. In this case we will gain points, and it helps prevent boredom. If not interested in helping the team, we can always see the different players to learn new ways to address the situation.

Graphics are a downer

One of the major handicaps that have haunted previous Ubisoft games is the graphical difference between the trailers and promos and the final products. The most notorious example was ‘Watch Dogs’, and this time the technical section of ‘Rainbow Six Siege’ was revised from its original format reducing the graphic quality. Although it not as bad as before, we are playing with a clear downgrade not sparing the players. It does not help that PC gamers, usually who have an advantage when it comes to resolution, are given versions that look pretty close to those found on a PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. On a good note the environments are destructible enough to consider new strategies quickly, always in line with the other players. Walls, floors and ceilings can be exploited to open gaps and surprise the enemy. The music, largely absent in the game, gives way to a clear and concise sound effects that help the player stand at all times. Steps, explosions, collapses and technical sounds (such as terrestrial drones) are some of the elements that we have to pay attention to get an overview of the action. Highly recommended to play with good headphones with surround effect, thereby maximizing our resources to bring down opponents.